About the RSF: Rare Species Fund

The Rare Species Fund was established to provide funding to critical on the ground international wildlife conservation programs, thereby complementing the educational messages and field research of T.I.G.E.R.S The Fund receives it financing base through a percentage of revenues taken in by T.I.G.E.R.S, the generosity of donations form exhibit guests, and the general public.
The Rare Species Fund actively supports the African Association of Zoos and Aquaria (PAAZAB) in its efforts to improve African zoo collection management, captive animal husbandry, and public educational messages. On a Continent where millions of wildebeest make an annual migration of several hundred miles, covering a huge swath of two countries, accompanied by zebra and other plains game, as well as many rare and endangered predators, almost 99 per cent of all African youth will never see any of these animals in their natural habitat.
The RSF is doing its part to help educate the citizens of this continent to appreciate the wealth of their wildlife diversity and the threats to its continued existence in Africa.

Swimming is a "L-Otter" Fun

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Big cats turn on the feline flair for daring photo shoot

A new book, called Big Cat Studio, showcases lions, tigers, leopards and more photographed against a white background in a studio, giving these images a candid and intimate feel. Click on images for a larger view.

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Palm Oil Production - Orangutans Extinct in 10 Years?

We hear about good oils and bad oils - the eating kind not the crude kind - as they relate to our health. And we hear about the bad done to our planet because of the latter, but not usually the former. But it turns out great damage is being done to the planet due to certain food oils as well. One oil, palm oil, is especially bad - it’s pretty daunting how many products it’s in, it seems like nearly all processed foods have it. The resulting demand for cheap palm oil - and therefore its mass production in Southeast Asia, has led to the destruction of much of the orangutan’s natural habitat. This loss of habitat is the main reason, "It is expected that orangutans could be gone in the wild in as little as ten years." Ten years and gone?

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